Everyone Wants A Chef

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Monday, June 19, 2017

Are You Drinking Enough Water



Is your pee so light you can barely tell you went to the bathroom? Good job. But if your pee looks more like lemon lime Gatorade, we've got some work to do.

Water is the most underutilized tool when it comes to your health. From clearing your skin and helping with headaches to giving you an endless supply of energy, simply drinking enough H2O each day can save you a lot of money on skin care products, pain relievers, and vitamins.

Yes, remembering to carry — much less sip on — a water bottle throughout the day is a challenge, but drinking enough water is essential for your wellbeing. How much is enough? Well, much like calories, the amount of water each person needs depends on a few different factors. Read on to calculate how much water you should be drinking each day based on your own unique needs.



Are You Drinking Enough Water for Your Body Weight?

According to the Mayo Clinic, men should generally drink about 13 cups of water a day, while women should aim for 9. But if you want to determine the exact amount you should be drinking by your body weight, it's easy to do.

Step 1: Take your weight (in lbs.) and divide that by 2.2

Step 2: Multiply that number depending on your age

if you're younger than 30, multiply by 40
if you're between 30 and 55, multiply by 35
if you're older than 55, multiply by 30
Step 3: Divide that sum by 28.3

Step 4: Your total is how many ounces of water you should drink each day. Divide that number by 8 to see your result in cups.

Are You Drinking Enough Water for Your Activity Level?

This one's a no-brainer: Anyone who works out on a regular basis should be drinking more water than someone who's sedentary. According to the American College of Sports Medicine, you should aim to add 12 ounces of water to your daily intake for every 30 minutes you're hitting the gym.

To calculate exactly how much water that is, use this equation:

your above result in oz. + (X minutes of exercise divided by 30 minutes) x 12 oz. = oz. of water you should drink per day

Are You Drinking Enough Water for Your Diet?


Your diet plays a big role in your water intake. Foods that already contain a lot of water — think Brussels sprouts, celery, and cabbage — get rid of unwanted fluids, so you'll want to drink more water to replace what was excreted, Jessica Fishman Levinson, MS, RD, CDN, told Self magazine.

On the other hand, foods that have a lot of sodium — like some popcorns and soup — will do the opposite, causing your body to retain water, and in turn, increasing your blood pressure. You'll be thirsty for a reason: Your body is begging for some fluids.



Monday, June 12, 2017

Burger History


The origin of the hamburger, like that of most peasant food, is not easy to track. It's been linked to invading Mongols carrying raw meat under their saddles as they rode long distances, thus tenderizing it. It's said that tenderized beef spread from there to Russia, and eventually Germany (Hamburg, as you may have guessed). But the modern burger is better known as an American food, and it's said to have been popularized in the 18th century in New York cafés, where it was served to attract sailors who'd spent time in one of Germany's popular ports, including (right again!) Hamburg.



The first burger appeared on US restaurant menus as early as the 1820s, but the Library of Congress attributes the first American Hamburger to a Connecticut restaurant called Louis' Lunch (in 1895). The burger likely took a major dip in popularity with the 1906 release of Upton Sinclair's The Jungle, which unsurprisingly turned a lot of people off to chopped meat. It took another hit after WWI due to anti-German sentiment (when it was temporarily named "Salisbury Steak") but was revitalized by White Castle, which marketed the tiny burgers known as sliders in the 1920s. McDonald's got into the game in the 1940s, industrialized the process of cooking and serving them, and the rest, as they say, is juicy, beefy, history.


Tuesday, May 30, 2017

Trump Wants Families On Food Stamps To Get Jobs.


The Majority Already Work

Story from: MARIA GODOY & ALLISON AUBREY





Some 55 percent of families with kids that receive food stamp benefits are earning wages. The problem is, those wages aren't enough to actually live on.
Whitney Hayward/Press Herald/Getty Images
When President Trump's budget director, Mick Mulvaney, unveiled the administration's budget blueprint earlier this week, which calls for significant cuts to food stamps, he noted that the aim of the budget was to get people working.

"If you're on food stamps and you're able-bodied, we need you to go to work. If you're on disability insurance and you're not supposed to be — if you're not truly disabled, we need you to go back to work," Mulvaney said Tuesday.

But the reality is, many people (44 percent) who rely on SNAP — the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, as food stamps is now known — have at least one person in the family working, according to the latest figures from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.


And when it comes to families on SNAP with kids, a majority — 55 percent — are bringing home wages, according to USDA. The problem is, those wages aren't enough to actually live on.

That jibes with what Feeding America, a network of U.S. food banks, found in 2014 when it issued Hunger in America, a comprehensive report on who uses food pantries and why. It found that 54 percent of the families who turn to pantries to help put food on the table have at least one member working, and that rate was much higher, 71 percent, for households with kids.

In fact, SNAP already requires able-bodied adults without children to find a job within three months and to work at least 20 hours a week or lose their benefits. All told, about 42 million people receive SNAP benefits.

As it turns out, many of the working poor who rely on SNAP benefits to get enough to eat are actually employed in the food industry. As we've reported, an analysis from University of California, Berkeley Labor Center found that 52 percent of fast-food workers are enrolled in, or have their families enrolled in, one or more public assistance programs such as SNAP, Medicaid or the Children's Health Insurance Program.


Overall, Trump's budget proposal would slash $191 billion from SNAP's budget over the next decade. But many of the states where residents rely most heavily on food stamps are also states where support for the president is strongest.


For instance, in West Virginia, Mississippi and Louisiana, 1 out of 5 residents receives SNAP benefits, according to an analysis from the liberal-leaning Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. All three states voted overwhelmingly for Trump last November.

Tuesday, April 25, 2017

Eating with the eyes' is hard-wired in the brain

Have you ever wondered why just seeing food can make your mouth start to water? By visualizing neuronal activity in specific areas of the zebrafish brain, scientists at the National Institute of Genetics (NIG) in Japan have revealed a direct link between visual perception of food and feeding motivation. The study, published in the April 20, 2017 issue of Nature Communications, suggests that "eating with the eyes" is deeply rooted in evolution.


"In vertebrate animals, feeding behavior is regulated by a brain area called the hypothalamus. The hypothalamic feeding center integrates information about bodily energy requirements and environmental food availability. Zebrafish, like humans, mostly use vision for recognition of food or prey. It was not known how the hypothalamus receives visual information about prey. We first demonstrated that neurons in the hypothalamus do indeed respond to the sight of prey. Then we looked for neurons in the visual system that responded to prey and discovered 'prey detector' neurons in an area called the pretectum. Furthermore, we found a direct neural link connecting the prey detector neurons to the hypothalamic feeding center," Dr. Muto, the leading author of the study, explained.



The key to this discovery has been recent progress in the development and improvement of the highly sensitive, genetically encoded calcium indicator GCaMP, which can be used to monitor neuronal activity in the form of calcium signals. Another important technology is the ability to control the specific neurons in which GCaMP is expressed. This was critical for recording distinct calcium signals from identifiable neurons.

Prof. Kawakami, the senior author, showed us his zebrafish facility where thousands of fish tanks can be seen, each of which contains genetically different fish that can turn on, or drive the GCaMP expression in different types of cells in the brain or in the body. This collection of driver fish lines is being used to study various tissues and cell types by zebrafish researchers all over the world. Of the nearly 2,000 such driver fish lines in the lab, two played important roles in the current study: one for the imaging of the prey detector neurons, and the other for the feeding center in the hypothalamus.

"Successful brain imaging was made possible through development of our genetic resources on which I have spent more than twenty years. This is the power of zebrafish genetics. This work showcases a successful application of our genetic resources in the study of brain function," Prof. Kawakami said.


"Our study demonstrates how tightly visual perception of food is linked to motivational feeding behavior in vertebrate animals. This is an important step toward understanding how feeding is regulated and can be modulated in normal conditions as well as in feeding disorders," Dr. Muto said.

Story Source:

Materials provided by Research Organization of Information and Systems.

Thursday, February 16, 2017

Mediterranean diet with virgin olive oil may boost 'good' cholesterol

A Mediterranean diet rich in virgin olive oil may enhance the cardioprotective benefits of high-density lipoproteins (HDL -- the "good" cholesterol) compared to other diets, according to new research in the American Heart Association's journal Circulation.



High levels of low-density lipoproteins (LDL -- the "bad cholesterol") and triglycerides, a type of blood fat, are associated with an increased risk of heart and blood vessel diseases. HDL cholesterol is associated with a lower risk because these lipoproteins help eliminate the excess cholesterol from the bloodstream.


"However, studies have shown that HDL doesn't work as well in people at high risk for heart attacks, strokes and other cardiovascular diseases, and that the functional ability of HDL matters as much as its quantity," said senior study author Montserrat Fitó, M.D., Ph.D., and coordinator of the Cardiovascular Risk and Nutrition Research Group at the Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute in Barcelona and at the Ciber of Physipathology of Obesity and Nutrition (CIBEROBN), Spain. "At the same time, small-scale trials have shown that consuming antioxidant-rich foods like virgin olive oil, tomatoes and berries improved HDL function in humans. We wanted to test those findings in a larger, controlled study."

Researchers randomly selected 296 people at high risk of cardiovascular disease participating in the PREDIMED (PREvención con DIeta MEDiterránea) study. Blood samples were taken from the participants at the beginning of the study and again at the end. Participants, average age 66, were randomly assigned to one of three diets for a year: a traditional Mediterranean diet enriched with virgin olive oil (about 4 tablespoons) each day, a traditional Mediterranean diet enriched with extra nuts (about a fistful) each day, or a healthy "control" diet that reduced consumption of red meat, processed food, high-fat dairy products and sweets. In addition to emphasizing fruit, vegetables, legumes, such as beans, chickpeas and lentils, and whole grains, both Mediterranean diets included moderate amounts of fish and poultry.

The study found that only the control diet reduced total and LDL cholesterol levels. None of the diets increased HDL levels significantly, but the Mediterranean diets did improve HDL function. The improvement in HDL function was much larger among those consuming an extra quantity of virgin olive oil.


Fitó and her team found that the Mediterranean diet enriched with virgin olive oil improved key HDL functions, including:

Reverse cholesterol transport, the process by which HDL removes cholesterol from plaque in the arteries and transports it to the liver where it is used to produce hormonal compounds or eliminated from the body.
Antioxidant protection, the ability of HDL to counteract the oxidation of LDL, which has been found to trigger the development of plaque in the arteries.
Vasodilator capacity, which relaxes blood vessels, keeping them open and blood flowing.
Researchers said they were surprised to find that the control diet, which like the Mediterranean diets was rich in fruits and vegetables, had a negative impact on HDL's anti-inflammatory properties. A decrease in HDL's anti-inflammatory capability is associated with cardiovascular disease. Participants on the Mediterranean diets did not experience a decline in this important HDL function, the authors wrote.

Researchers said the differences in results between the diets were relatively small because the modifications of the Mediterranean diets were modest and the control diet was a healthy one. They added that study results are mainly focused on a high cardiovascular risk population that includes people who can obtain the most benefits from this diet intervention.

Still, Fitó said, "following a Mediterranean diet rich in virgin olive oil could protect our cardiovascular health in several ways, including making our 'good cholesterol' work in a more complete way."

Story Source:

Materials provided by American Heart Association. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

Tuesday, January 17, 2017

Shhh! DUI Fries Are California's Best-Kept Secret

by Peter Pham/Foodbeast

DUI Fries sound like something your drunk buddy invented, or some kind of urban legend about fries that cure your hangover, but they're really the ultimate combination of fries that you probably never heard of.


If you search for #DUIFries on Instagram, only 629 photos come up. It's insane that a dish as crazy as this one hasn't even cracked 1,000 IG posts, as of this writing. But those in the know, know what's up with these majestic, artery-clogging fries.
About five years ago, a friend of mine introduced me to DUI Fries. He told me that if I went to a restaurant called Jim's Burgers in City of Industry, California, I could find some chili cheese fries that were topped with not only pastrami, but carne asada, as well.


This no doubt intrigued me, and we set out on this mission to find the DUI Fries. As with most "secret menu items," I nervously asked the cashier for these "DUI Fries," fully expecting to be given a, "What's that?" But she put in the order, and I awaited the greasy goodness to fill my insides.
It was pretty much everything I hoped for, as I felt like death afterward, but came to terms with the over 1,500-calorie meal possibly being my last before my heart exploded.
I went in search for the origin of the majestic DUI Fries, and was led to Dino's Chicken and Burgers. After speaking with Jim Pantazis, the small burger chain's owner, he said the DUI Fries were born back in 2005 at their Pico Rivera location, and actually had nothing to do with alcohol, despite the obvious name.
"It's not driving under the influence, it's Dino's Ultimate Invention," Pantazis explained. "We thought, 'What can we make — something to give the customers their money's worth?'"
So Pantazis figured he'd take the chili cheese fries, and just stack it with meats that they already had available in the restaurant.


They gave the fries an identity, so that they weren't just carne asada and pastrami chili cheese fries. They attached a catchy name to it that was short, sweet, and memorable.
DUI Fries are one of Southern California's best kept food secrets, and the craziest thing about it, the ingredients are readily available at most mom & pop burger shacks around Cali. Because of this, the fries have expanded to different locations, some even giving them a different name, but same look.


Archibald's Drive-Thru has their own version in their five So Cal locations:
Victory Diner in Orange County sells them now, too:
Arry's Super Burgers in Montebello will give you these heart-stopping fries:
Like I mentioned earlier, the place where I first experienced them, Jim's Super Burgers serves up a mean plate of them:
Hell, there's even places that call them "Loco Fries" like Rubi's Grill and Frosty Freeze in Whittier.
Whether you call them DUI Fries, Loco Fries, or simply ask for carne asada and pastrami chili cheese fries, these are a gem in Southern California. Those in the know, might covet them as much as In-N-Out's glorious Animal Style Fries, maybe even more, since they've been on the low for so long.
Y'all need to experience these fries, and the chosen few who already enjoy them might hate me for this story, but I can't be greedy.
Check out one of the Dino's locations for the original version (Also, their chicken fries are fire, but that's one secret to uncover another time), or if one of the other restaurants mentioned are closer to you, pop in and see if you can handle them.

Just make sure you go with a friend. Ya know, just in case you need someone to quickly perform CPR on you.

Friday, December 16, 2016

Beans and peas increase fullness more than meat

Numerous modern dietary recommendations encourage high protein consumption to help with weight loss or prevent the age-related loss of muscle mass. Furthermore, consuming more vegetable-based protein from beans and peas, and less protein from meats such as pork, veal and beef, is recommended because meat production is a far greater burden on our climate than vegetable cultivation. Until now, we haven't known very much about how legumes like beans and peas stack up against meat in satiating hunger. As a result, little has been known about the impact of vegetables and the possibility of them catalyzing or maintaining weight loss.
High protein vegetables fill more


The recent study demonstrated that protein-rich meals based on beans and peas increased satiety more in the study participants than protein-rich veal and pork based meals. In the study, 43 young men were served three different meals in which patties -- consisting of either beans/peas or veal/pork -- were a key element. The study also demonstrated that when participants ate a protein-rich meal based on beans and peas, they consumed 12% fewer calories in their next meal than if they had eaten a meat-based meal.
"The protein-rich meal composed of legumes contained significantly more fiber than the protein-rich meal of pork and veal, which probably contributed to the increased feeling of satiety," according to the head researcher, Professor Anne Raben of the University of Copenhagen's Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports.
Sustainable eating can help weight loss
Most interestingly, the study also demonstrated that a less protein-rich meal based on beans and peas was as satiating and tasty as the protein-rich veal and pork-based meals.

"It is somewhat contrary to the widespread belief that one ought to consume a large amount of protein because it increases satiety more. Now, something suggests that one can eat a fiber-rich meal, with less protein, and achieve the same sensation of fullness. While more studies are needed for a definitive proof, it appears as if vegetable-based meals -- particularly those based on beans and peas -- both can serve as a long term basis for weight loss and as a sustainable eating habit," concludes Professor Raben.
The results are published in the scientific journal Food & Nutrition in the article: Meals based on vegetable protein sources (beans and peas) are more satiating than meals based on animal protein sources (veal and pork) -- a randomized cross-over meal test study.